I absolutely adore wines from Alto Adige.  This mountainous wonderland is home to some of Italy’s most complex terroir, which produces some truly spectacular wines.  Terlano’s vineyards are no exception.  Drinking a wine like this Terlano Pinot Noir calls for a special recipe- so I pulled out the Big Guns.

My dad pointed me towards this Mustard Crusted Rack of Lamb recipe a few years ago.  It was so easy to make, and was such a hit with my husband that I have made probably 20 loosely interpreted versions since.  Who do we have to thank for this lovely stand-by recipe?  Emeril Lagasse.  Bam, baby!  Click here for the official recipe from FoodTV.com

The basic premise of the recipe is to being by searing off a rack of lamb, then coating it in a mixture of mustard, garlic and rosemary.  You then dust the sticky, mustard-coated rack with parmigiano-laced breadcrumbs, and bake until golden brown in the oven.  This is the essence of simplicity, resulting in some of the best meat lollipops you’ll ever taste.

Season, then sear the rack of lamb

Smother with Mustard mixture, then coat in breadcrumbs and Parmigiano.

The whole reason for the rack of lamb was Terlano’s Pinot Noir vintage 2010.  This is high-altitude, funky Pinot laced with blackberries and spice.  No hint of wood or alcohol- only the faint tingle of wet rocks on your tongue after a clean finish.  Nothing else would quite emphasize the wild, gamey lamb like a sip of this pale magenta elixir.  I love the play of fresh rosemary against this supple, yet stiff-backed Pinot Noir.  Racy and bracing to the end.

It’s logical to think first of the bright, sexy white wines from Alto Adige- Pinot Bianco, Pinot Grigio, Sauvignon- but you’d be doing yourself a disservice not to consider the region’s red wines as well.  Wolfgang Weber of the San Francisco Chronicle recently mentioned quite a few intriguing and beguiling examples.  Hopefully a few of Alto Adige’s wines are making their way to wine shop near you- they’re all special.  Terlano’s Pinot Noir just happens to be closest to my heart.

……..More

My dad pointed me towards this Mustard Crusted Rack of Lamb recipe a few years ago.  It was so easy to make, and was such a hit with my husband that I have made probably 20 loosely interpreted versions since.  Who do we have to thank for this lovely stand-by recipe?  Emeril Lagasse.  Bam, baby!  Click here for the official recipe from FoodTV.com

The basic premise of the recipe is to being by searing off a rack of lamb, then coating it in a mixture of mustard, garlic and rosemary.  You then dust the sticky, mustard-coated rack with parmigiano-laced breadcrumbs, and bake until golden brown in the oven.  This is the essence of simplicity, resulting in some of the best meat lollipops you’ll ever taste.

Season, then sear the rack of lamb

Smother with Mustard mixture, then coat in breadcrumbs and Parmigiano.

The whole reason for the rack of lamb was Terlano’s Pinot Noir vintage 2010.  This is high-altitude, funky Pinot laced with blackberries and spice.  No hint of wood or alcohol- only the faint tingle of wet rocks on your tongue after a clean finish.  Nothing else would quite emphasize the wild, gamey lamb like a sip of this pale magenta elixir.  I love the play of fresh rosemary against this supple, yet stiff-backed Pinot Noir.  Racy and bracing to the end.

It’s logical to think first of the bright, sexy white wines from Alto Adige- Pinot Bianco, Pinot Grigio, Sauvignon- but you’d be doing yourself a disservice not to consider the region’s red wines as well.  Wolfgang Weber of the San Francisco Chronicle recently mentioned quite a few intriguing and beguiling examples.  Hopefully a few of Alto Adige’s wines are making their way to wine shop near you- they’re all special.  Terlano’s Pinot Noir just happens to be closest to my heart.

About The Author

I love all things Italian: the beautiful country of Italia, the Italians themselves, the language, the food… and above all, I love Italian wine. The people I meet in my charmed life are fascinating, the wines are extraordinary. I needed a special place like this to write about them, and to remember them.

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